With the Right Information, You Can Make the Best Decisions
About Your Foot and Ankle Health

At Capital District Podiatry, we believe that having the right information will help our patients make the best decisions about their foot and ankle health. That is why we are dedicated to providing you with an extensive resource on our website full of a wide array of topics on foot and ankle injuries, conditions, prevention and treatments.

This information is intended for you to learn about your symptoms, what may have lead to your injury and what treatment options we can provide for you. This patient education library is reliable, trustworthy and valuable information so please use it anytime you have a concern about your foot and ankle health.

Preventative education can keep you free from many of the common foot and ankle problems that affect people today. Accidents do happen and the type of care and how fast you get it will make the difference in how quickly you get back to your life without foot pain. Some of the common conditions diagnosed and treated by Dr. Pandya and our excellent staff include:

Achilles problems

Ankle Sprains

Arthritis pain

Bone spurs

Bunions

Hammertoes

Heel pain

Nail problems

Nerve conditions

  • Neuromas
  • Neuropathy

Skin problems

  • Warts
  • Fungal infections
  • Corns and calluses
  • Cracks and sores

Toe fractures

 

Your overall health affects your feet and many underlying conditions can cause damage to your feet first. It is important if you have a medical condition such as poor circulation, diabetes or arthritis that you not only stay informed of risk factors and symptoms to be aware of but that you catch problems early and seek appropriate treatment promptly.

We encourage you to use our patient education resources to understand any health conditions you may face and to make an appointment at any time. Call our podiatric office directly at (518) 273-0053 or request an appointment online.

As an extra resource for you, Dr. Pandya has written two books full of valuable information that you can receive at no cost. To have your free copy sent to you today, simply click on the book images of Tiptoe Your Way to Happy Feet and Stop Heel Pain found on our homepage.

More than 24 million people participate in some kind of aerobic exercise, which offers a host of health benefits, including increased cardiopulmonary efficiency, strengthened heart and lungs, improved circulation, lowered cholesterol levels, and stress and anxiety reduction.

Because aerobic exercise involves quick lateral movements, jumping, and leaping for extended periods of time, proper foot care plays a vital part in keeping the entire body fit. Common injuries from aerobics often involve the foot, ankle, and lower leg. Improper shoes, surfaces, or routines, and straining muscles by too vigorous a routine can lead to foot problems. Experts say that hardwood floors, especially with padded mats, are the best surfaces for your feet during aerobic exercise. And don't forget to stretch all the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in the leg, ankle, foot, and toes in a warm-up and cool-down periods before and after aerobics.

 

Aerobic Shoes

Proper shoes are crucial to successful, injury-free aerobics. Old sneakers in your closet are not the proper shoes for aerobics. Major shoe companies today have designed special shoes for aerobics, which provide the necessary arch and side support; they also have soles that allow for the twisting and turning of an aerobics regimen. Be aware that running shoes lack the necessary lateral stability and lift the heel too high to support aerobic activity. They also often have an acute outside flare that may put the athlete at greater risk of injury from the side-by-side motion in aerobics.

Aerobic shoes should provide sufficient cushioning and shock absorption to compensate for pressure on the foot many times greater than found in walking. They must also have good medial-lateral stability. Impact forces from aerobics can reach up to six times the force of gravity, which is transmitted to each of the 26 bones in the foot.

Because of the many side-to-side motions, aerobic shoes need an arch design that will compensate for these forces. Look for shoes with sufficiently thick upper leather or strap support to provide forefoot stability and prevent slippage of the foot and lateral shoe "breakup." Make sure shoes have a toe box that is high enough to prevent irritation of your toes and nails.

Two other tips: buy your aerobics shoes in the afternoon, when your feet swell slightly and wear the same socks (preferably made of an acrylic blend) that you will wear during aerobics.